Khayelitsha Commission of Inquiry into Policing

In 2014, Judge Kate O'Regan and Advocate Vusi Pikoli chaired a commission of inquiry into policing in Khayelitsha. GroundUp covered the inquiry in depth. Here are our reports as well as contributed opinion pieces from the inquiry.

Khayelitsha residents debate policing with Members of Parliament

“What is happening in Khayelitsha reflects what is happening in other black communities across South Africa”

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News | 6 April 2017

Deputy minister admits failures at Khayelitsha police stations

Maggie Sotyu said a lack of detectives needed to be addressed “quickly”

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News | 7 March 2017

SJC accuses police of contempt of court

Picket in Cape Town over allocation of police resources

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Brief | 24 January 2017

Nyanga Community Police Forum joins police resource court case

Litigation to compel police minister and national commissioner to allocate police resources equitably

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Brief | 23 September 2016

Why we are taking the Minister of Police to court

Police resource allocation is an apartheid remnant

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Opinion | 14 April 2016

Activists take police minister to court

Demand equitable allocation of resources between rich and poor areas

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News | 30 March 2016

SJC march for justice in Khayelitsha

The murder and rape of Sinoxolo Mafevuka triggers anger at lack of policing

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News | 15 March 2016

Eduard Grebe’s allegations against police have not been investigated

Further reports of police brutality surface

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News | 21 January 2016

Khayelitsha activists want answers from Nhleko

Police Minister Nathi Nhleko addressed over a thousand people at an Imbizo in the Khayelitsha Stadium on Saturday. He accused the Khayelitsha Commission of Inquiry into Policing of being politically motivated. Earlier at the same meeting, ANC Western Cape head Marius Fransman, made the same accusation.

GroundUp staff and Bernard Chiguvare

Brief | 19 October 2015

Phiyega rejects recommendations of O’Regan Inquiry

Police Commissioner Riah Phiyega has “denied, disputed or redirected to the [Western Cape Provincial Government and City of Cape Town]” every recommendation of the O’Regan Commission of Inquiry into allegations of police inefficiency in Khayelitsha.

GroundUp Staff and Bernard Chiguvare

News | 7 August 2015

Khayelitsha police, community and activists find ways to tackle crime

The police, civil society and Khayelitsha community activists are beginning to work together to give effect to the commission of inquiry into policing's recommendations. Here's an update on progress so far, and plans for next year.

Daneel Knoetze

News | 28 November 2014

Police: the facts behind the Commissioner’s “good story”

Parliament’s Portfolio Committee on Policing should ask police management some tough questions, writes Zackie Achmat in the second in a series of articles on policing.

Zackie Achmat

Opinion | 24 October 2014

Western Cape crime stats to be monthly

According to a report by the Khayelitsha Commission of Inquiry released in August, the crime statistics for the three police stations in Khayelitsha when combined, record the highest number of violent crimes in the country year on year. The national crime statistics were released on Friday in Pretoria and they show that there has been a decrease in contact crimes (such as murder, sexual crimes, assault and robbery) from last year in Khayelitsha.

Mary-Anne Gontsana

News | 22 September 2014

Community hotline to Khayelitsha’s top cops

The cell phone numbers of Khayelitsha's top cops will be posted in newspapers this week in a bid to increase the responsiveness of the police in the area.

Daneel Knoetze

News | 22 September 2014

Crime summit for Khayelitsha needed, say organisations

In a bid to tackle the many police “inefficiencies” highlighted by scores of residents in the Khayelitsha commission of inquiry report, community organisations plan to host a joint crime summit with police.

Barbara Maregele

News | 5 September 2014

Khayelitsha Commission findings: what now?

The conclusion of the Khayelitsha Commission has left many people asking “what now?” writes Ayanda Nyoka.

Ayanda Nyoka

Opinion | 3 September 2014