| EASTERN CAPE

Rural school gets toilets thanks to private company

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For years primary school children were forced to use an open field

Photo of new toilets
New toilets were donated by Amalooloo after GroundUp ran an article on the school. Photo: Yamkela Ntshongwana
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Using an open field as a toilets is now a thing of the past for school children at Ntshingeni Senior Primary near Queenstown in the Eastern Cape.

About 21 toilets were donated by Amalooloo this week.

Amalooloo co-ordinator Seka Mopeli said he saw the article GroundUp in May about the school and forwarded it to his seniors. They agreed to help.

“I came to the school to check the condition myself. I was very sad when I saw the learners in bushes relieving themselves. I also went to check the old toilets … They were so full … and built far from school premises,” he said.

Mopeli said they have donated seven toilets for girls, seven for boys, three for female teachers and two for male teachers. He also said two more toilets are to be built on the sport grounds.

School Governing Body member Nokuphumla Sithetha-Dywili said, “We thank Amalooloo … Our teachers are now going to be safe, and also the learners.”

School principal Malixole Dliso said, “We are very happy and grateful to Amalooloo for what they have done for us … We have been crying for so many years about these old toilets but our cry was falling on deaf ears. It was when the story was published when we saw a reaction.”

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TOPICS:  Sanitation

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