Young Seedat loves playing football for South Africa

Margo Fortune
Photo courtesy of Ebrahiem Seedat.
Margo Fortune

Ebrahim Seedat is just 19 years old, but this left-wing and midfielder is making waves in the soccer world.

GroundUp: What teams have you played for?

Seedat: Avendale athletico, Cape United and Sporting Lokeren in Belgium

GroundUp: Where did you grow up?

Seedat: Kewtown in Athlone

GroundUp: How you got involved in soccer?

Seedat: I grew up playing soccer with friends in Kewtown. That let me stay away from all the bad stuff what was in my community. I was just born to play this beautiful game called football.

GroundUp: Do you have a role model?

Seedat: My role model is Mesut Ozil (German footballer who plays for Real Madrid).

GroundUp: You’ve been playing in Belgium. What’s that like?

Seedat: Playing in Belgium was a good experience. I learned a lot from the coaches and from my teammates. I have become a better player and I’m still learning and developing more.

GroundUp: Did you get home sick?

Seedat: Yes I got home sick but at the end it was what I always wanted and that’s what kept me going.

GroundUp: What’s it like playing u20 South Africa team?

Seedat: First of all its an honor representing my country. It feels good to play for the country because the whole of South Africa is behind you and supporting you.

GroundUp: Do you have any challenges?

Seedat: Of course, there are challenges. You need to fight for your position to be in the starting 11.

GroundUp: What Message would you have for young people?

Seedat: Just keep working hard. Be loyal and respect the game and stay away from crime. Play your best because you never know who is watching you. Stay humble and believe in yourself and most important Allah (God).

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TOPICS:  Sport

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